Career & Retirement News

Weekly Roundup -- October 1, 2010

A compilation of interesting articles on midlife career change and retirement transition

Click on headlines or scroll down for expanded summaries and links to original stories

 

This Week's Roundup


The Restless Soul in the Bathroom Mirror -- The New York Times
A public relations executive recounts the process and tools he used to help orchestrate a successful midlife career change.


Your New Retirement Job: Staying Engaged -- Forbes Online
Carolyn Rosenblatt, a career advisor on Forbes Online, presents a recipe for happiness in retirement.


Nebraska's Billion Dollar Coaching Assistant -- Sports Illustrated
Business tycoon Joe Moglia was the CEO of TD Ameritrade and a multimillionaire.  Then he quit to become an unpaid intern on the coaching staff of Nebraska's Cornhuskers.


For Those Itching to Get Started in An Encore Career -- Civic Ventures
Civic Ventures has teamed up with the New York Times Knowledge Network to offer a series of seminars on how to find a rewarding second career.


Job Satisfaction Vs. A Big Paycheck -- The New York Times
Does earning a higher salary make you happier?  Beyond $75,000 a year, a new study suggests income increases have little effect on personal happiness. 

 

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Expanded Summaries and Links To Original Stories



The Restless Soul In the Bathroom Mirror -- The New York Times
Lee Weinstein, formerly a public relations executive for Nike, describes in detail the process he went through after realizing that he had outgrown his job and needed to move on.  His quest included consultations with a career coach to define his goals, exploration through reading and self-reflection, discussions with friends and family, and a variety of exercises to push his thinking to a higher level.  Weinstein describes a process that is both disciplined and flexible, in which he allows himself to explore a variety of different approaches that all contribute to his successful search for satisfying new career.  Read More.



Your New Retirement Job:  Staying Engaged -- Forbes Online
Carolyn Rosenblatt, a blogger who specializes in retirement issues, presents her recipe for finding happiness and fulfillment in retirement. She prescribes three key ingredients: Structure, Purpose, and Community.  Structure to keep you grounded. Purpose to provide a sense of direction and engagement.  And Community to provide the human interaction essential to personal happiness.  Read More.



Nebraska's Billion Dollar Coaching Assistant -- Sports Illustrated
Joe Moglia loved football, played it in high school and college, and started his professional life as a coach. But somewhere along the line he got sidetracked by a career move  that ultimately led him to become the CEO of TD Ameritrade and a multimillionaire.  Now he's quit his job and has returned to his original passion as an unpaid assistant for the Nebraska Cornhuskers. Read More.



For Those Itching to Get Started in An Encore Career -- Civic Ventures
Marc Freedman of Civic Ventures coined the term "Encore Career" to describe the trend of baby boomers reinventing themselves in retirement with the goal of making a social contribution.  Freedman and a panel of other experts have teamed up with the New York Times Knowledge Network to create of series of seminars on career reinvention in retirement.  The program will be offered online on October 22 and 29 and costs $95. Find Out More.



Job Satisfaction Vs. A Big Paycheck -- The New York Times
The tradeoff between a satisfying job and a satisfying paycheck is an issue that many people wrestle with.  A new study indicates that beyond and income of $75,000 a year, money has little effect on happiness, enjoyment, sadness, or stress.  (But of course the story is much more complex than that...) Read More